World Wide Affair
"There will always be someone else with a different view than you."

It is reported that Maya Angelou has likened racial microaggressions or petty humiliations to “small murders,” in contrast to the blatant forms of oppressions called “grand executions,” in which the lethal nature of biased acts is obvious (Greene, 2000). Microaggressions have the lifelong insidious effects of silencing, invalidating, and humiliating the identity and/or voices of those who are oppressed. Although their lethality is less obvious, they nevertheless grind down and wear out the victims.

Studies reveal that a lifetime of microaggressions takes a major toll on the psychological functioning of marginalized groups in our society (Constantine & Sue, 2007; Crocker & Major, 1989; Herek, Gillis, & Cogan, 2009; Lyness & Thompson, 2000; National Academies, 2006; Pierce, 1978, 1988, 1995; Salvatore & Shelton, 2007; Solórzano et al., 2000; Steele, Spencer, & Aronson, 2002; Symanski, 2009). When speaking about the Black experience, for example, microaggressions have been described as “offensive mechanisms used against blacks”; they are “often innocuous,” but the “cumulative weight of their never-ending burden” may result in “diminished mortality, augmented morbidity, and flattened confidence” (Pierce, Carew, Pierce-Gonzalez, & Willis, 1978).

Derald Wing Sue, Microaggressions in Everyday Life (via wretchedoftheearth)

mehreenkasana:

Back with the weekly reading recommendation list: 

Download the free ebook of The Case for Sanctions Against Israel here.

The Practice of International Solidarity by Zehra Husain.

“They are not friends to the Pashtuns.” Report by Mahvish Ahmad.

For our young Marxists: Ken Cockerel, a communist activist with the League of Revolutionary Black Workers, explains capitalism in the most unpretentious and reaffirming language possible.

For our aspiring writers, here is a beautiful and succinct essay on the significance of plot without conflict.

Reading Henri Lefebvre on the production of public and social space is enriching but often dense nonetheless. In order to simplify the oft-hefty jargon that is characteristic of Lefebvre, Stuart Elden provides a refreshing interpretation of the French Marxist philosopher’s work.

The Poetics of Solidarity: Palestine in Modern Urdu Poetry.

Navneet Alang’s There Is No Garden For Us To Return To.

Claire Biship on the participatory art and politics of spectatorship derived from the brilliant and Brecht-influenced work of Augusto Boal’s Theater of the Oppressed.

Finally, for our film students and critics, Harun Farocki’s Inextinguishable Fire is based on the American war in Vietnam. It becomes apropos in light of the ongoing genocide in Gaza.

View list on Tanqeed.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.
The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.
The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 
For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

ami-angelwings:

badass-bharat-deafmuslimpunkstar:

An Indian woman, a Japanese woman, and a Syrian woman, all training to be doctors at Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia, 1880s. (Image courtesy Legacy Center, Drexel University College of Medicine Archives, Philadelphia, PA. Image #p0103) (x)

The Indian woman, Dr. Anandi Gopal Joshi, was the first Indian woman to earn a degree in Western medicine, and also believed to be the first Hindu woman to set foot on American soil.

The Japanese woman, Dr. Kei Okami, was the first Japanese woman to obtain a degree in Western Medicine.

The Syrian woman is Dr. Sabat Islambooly.  Her name is spelled incorrectly on that photograph. 

For those interested, here’s more information on other women of color who attended and graduated from Women’s Medical College of Philadelphia in the past, with a focus on the Japanese-American women they accepted during the US WW2 internment of Japanese-Americans.

(Source: badass-bharat-deafmuslim-artista)

This is commander. Anything that’s mobile, that moves in the zone, even if it’s a three-year-old, needs to be killed. Over.

Captain R, an Israeli army officer who repeatedly shot a 13-year-old Palestinian girl in Gaza in 2004.

The Guardian reported:

"[Captain R] dismissed a warning from another soldier that she was a child by saying he would have killed her even if she was three years old. The officer… was charged… with illegal use of his weapon, conduct unbecoming an officer and other relatively minor infractions after emptying all 10 bullets from his gun’s magazine into Iman al-Hams [the child killed] when she walked into a “security area” on the edge of Rafah refugee camp…

The case came to light after soldiers under the command of Captain R went to an Israeli newspaper to accuse the army of covering up the circumstances of the killing. A subsequent investigation by the officer responsible for the Gaza strip, Major General Dan Harel, concluded that the captain had “not acted unethically”.

However, the military police launched an investigation, which resulted in charges against the unit commander. Iman’s parents have accused the army of whitewashing the affair by filing minor charges against Captain R. They want him prosecuted for murder.”

The Zionist narrative of “self-defense” breaks down pretty quickly when you know stories like this. 

(via america-wakiewakie)

Eric Garner's Death Ruled A Homicide By NYC Medical Examiner

imnothavinit:

The NYC Medical Examiner has finally released its conclusion on the death of Eric Garner, the Staten Island man who died after police put him in a choke hold during his arrest last month. Though there was early speculation that perhaps Garner died from cardiac arrest, and not the chokehold, the report concludes Garner died from “compression of neck (choke hold), compression of chest and prone positioning during physical restraint by police.”

Contributing conditions, according to the ME, were “acute and chronic bronchial asthma; Obesity; Hypertensive cardiovascular disease.” The report concludes that Garner’s death was a homicide.

Garner’s death has prompted widespread outrage and promises from NYPD Commissioner Bill Bratton to retrain all NYPD officers. Chokeholds have been prohibited by the NYPD since 1993, but police continue to use them. A year after the ban went into effect, an NYPD officer killed 29-year-old Anthony Baez with an illegal choke hold during an argument sparked by Baez’s football hitting a cop car.

And three days before Garner’s death, another officer was caught on video appearing to put a suspect in a chokehold. Last weekend, an officer allegedly put a pregnant woman in a chokehold outside her Brooklyn home.

Police say Garner had been selling illegal untaxed cigarettes on a Staten Island sidewalk and that they were responding to a complaint about his behavior. The fatal arrest was captured on video by a witness, and raised questions about how Garner’s death would have been handled if not for the documentation. The first police report about the incident, for instance, makes no mention of the use of a chokehold.

Police Officer Daniel Pantaleo, who put Garner in the chokehold, has been stripped of his gun and badge and placed on modified duty pending the outcome of the investigation. The EMTs who lackadaisically responded to an unresponsive Garner have been suspended. Mayor Bill de Blasio has promised a full investigation into Garner’s death.

UPDATE: Here’s Mayor de Blasio’s statement:

"On behalf of all New Yorkers, I extend my deepest sympathies to the family of Eric Garner, on this day we have received the Medical Examiner’s findings concerning the cause of his death. My administration will continue to work with all involved authorities, including the Richmond County District Attorney, to ensure a fair and justified outcome. “We all have a responsibility to work together to heal the wounds from decades of mistrust and create a culture where the police department and the communities they protect respect each other—and that’s a responsibility that Commissioner Bratton and I take very seriously. I’ve said that we would make change, and we will. As Mayor, I remain absolutely committed to ensuring that the proper reforms are enacted to ensure that this won’t happen again. “I’d also like to thank the Office of Chief Medical Examiner for conducting a thorough and expeditious review of the cause of death in this tragic incident.”

america-wakiewakie:

California Leans Heavily on Thousands of Inmate Firefighters | KQED

The Bully Fire, which has burned more than 12,600 acres in Shasta County, is nearly contained. In the two weeks since it ignited, about 2,000 firefighters have battled the blaze. Nearly half of them — 900 — are inmates with the California Department of Corrections. These “low-level offenders” making just $2 a day are a crucial component in how the state battles wildfires.

“First day we was out here it was like 111 or 115 and that’s not including the fire,” says Emir Dunn. His orange fire suit swamps his slender body, but don’t be fooled by his size. Like most inmate firefighters he lugs more than 100 pounds of gear with him: an axe, food, water, fuel for the chainsaw.

The air tastes like a charcoal briquette. The wind picks up, and a mix of dirt and ash swirl from the ground. Dunn scours the scorched area looking for embers that could reignite. He sees smoke billowing from the ground. He readies the hose and he and a crewmate blast the smoking mound with water.

Dunn and 15 others will stay here for a 24-hour shift. They might catch some sleep, but very little. They hiked up here and they’ll hike back to the pick-up point, a slog that’s likely to be several miles.

Each crew has one professional firefighter, a captain, and the rest are men convicted of crimes including drug offenses and armed robbery.

(Read Full Text) (Photo Credit: Adam Grossberg/KQED)

theelusivebloggeur:

MashAllah MashAllah MashAllah the woodwork in this shop in Jifna is amazing (All photos taken by me)

arjuna-vallabha:

Roots and ruins, Ta Prohm temple at Angkor

greeneyes55:

Mexico City 1963
Photo: Henri Cartier-Bresson 

greeneyes55:

Mexico City 1963

Photo: Henri Cartier-Bresson 

salviprince:

Central American Children Humanize Their Struggle Before Congress

Three Central American Children testified before the Congressional Progressive Caucus in Washington D.C. on Tuesday July 29th, 2014.  The children were: Mayeli Hernández, 12, migrated from Honduras last year in July of 2013; Dulce Medina, 15, came from Guatemala five years; and Saúl Martínez, 15, from El Salvador, the most recent refugee to arrive in just April of this year. All of the children made their journey as unaccompanied minors. They shared their experiences of violence in Central America, their arduous journey through Mexico and into the United States, as well as the abuse and dehumanization they faced in U.S. immigration facilities upon arrival. Speaking directly to their time spent in the “ice-boxes” or unbearably cold holding cells without blankets or warm clothing, the children recounted how in some cases people would turn blue due to the slowing of blood circulation. Saúl Martinez had this to say, “Please don’t mistreat children the way your government has mistreated me. Finally, I want to ask you not to deport children like me because it’s very possible that you will deport them to violence and to their death.” 

Watch the full video here.


"Why Nicaraguan Kids Aren’t Fleeing to the U.S.”

San Diego radio station KPBS discusses Nicaragua’s absence from the unaccompanied Central American children debate. Nicaragua is one of the poorest countries in Central America, has a difficult history of war and violence yet doesn’t have masses of children heading to the U.S.-Mexico border. This article attempts to find the reasons for the Nicaraguan exception from this humanitarian crisis. The piece suggests the lower rates of criminal activity, community policing, the successes of the Sandinista revolution, and the individual decisions of many Nicaraguans to forego the American Dream for work, advancement, and stability in neighboring Costa Rica.

Read the full article here.


El Salvador Part of a United Latin American Front Against Israel

El Salvador is one of five countries in Latin America, and the only one in Central America, to recall its ambassadors from Tel Aviv. El Salvador follows the example of Brazil, Chile, Ecuador and Peru who have done the same. It is worth mentioning that Cuba was the first Latin American country to sever ties with Israel in 1973. Venezuela and Bolivia both cut diplomatic ties with Israel in 2009. Argentina, Mexico, Nicaragua, and Uruguay have also condemned the Israeli assault but have not formally cut ties with the State of Israel. El Salvador, which has a sizeable Palestinian community living on its soil, continues to protest against Israel’s illegal military offensive in Gaza. The Salvadoran Ministry of External Relations recently stated, “This action is taken before the serious escalation of violence and implementation of indiscriminate bombing from Israel into the Gaza Strip that has killed children, girls, women and men.”

Read the article in Spanish here.

Co-written and co-curated by salviprince and Jorge Cuéllar

For more visit www.SalvaCultura.com